Want to work differently? A grant from the AIM Hallmarks Awards can help you

Now open for applications, the latest round of the  AIM Hallmarks Awards will make grants totalling around £70,000 in England and just over £20,000 in Wales.

Funded by Arts Council England and supported by Welsh Government, the AIM Hallmarks Awards offer grants of between £5,000 and £15,000 to help AIM member museums and heritage sites to begin to use the principles in the AIM Hallmarks to improve the way they work.

So, what type of project has been previously funded and how can you ensure you are successful? We talked to Catherine Allan, Chair of Trustees and Co Director from Rhayader Museum & Gallery in Wales who were successful in Round 2 to see how the Awards have benefited them – and what tips they could share to help your application.

Rhayader Museum & Gallery

AIM: Hi Catherine, thanks for taking the time to talk to us. Can you explain why you decided to apply for the AIM Hallmarks Awards please?

CA: At Rhayader Museum and Gallery, we had already identified a project we wanted to work on and I felt that it would fit really well within the grant guidelines and would give us the opportunity to do the work. We had already trialled parts of the project – which was about recording local town and county shows – two years ago with volunteers so knew that what we wanted to do would be possible!

AIM: How did it enable you to work in new ways as an organisation?

CA: There were three aspects to this: using volunteers in new ways, using new technology and – especially – developing new kinds of community involvement. Encouraging people to record their community in various ways allows them to use new technology, take ownership of the process, to feel that their way of life is of value. It gives those who are not so skilled more confidence and improved social networks. It has allowed us to re-engage with sections of our community in ways we haven’t been able to do in a while.

AIM: How does the project AIM has funded fit in with your strategic priorities?

CA: Rhayader Museum and Gallery, has a mission statement which includes promoting participation in arts and heritage activity for social and cultural benefit, encouraging skill sharing and learning and using creative projects to celebrate and represent the area’s distinctive voices. We work in partnership with all ages and abilities to foster a sense of place, worth and confidence. As well as the project fitting in with the mission statement aims, it also fitted in with our aim as a museum, of growing our audience.

AIM: What did you apply to the AIM Hallmarks Awards to fund?

CA: We are a rural area and have four small agricultural shows around small town of Rhayader (population around 2,000.) Rhayader also has a large summer Carnival. Although some of the same people go to and take part in the Carnival, the events are very different in feel and content.

Carnival is a town celebration with a procession, a crowning of the Carnival Queen, visits from other towns with their floats and princesses and lots of people dressing up. Many different organisations take part and visitors come from far and wide. There is food and drink and live music all day coming from the local pubs and the streets are busy from late morning to evening.

The shows are much quieter and are the way the farming community and their families celebrate. Outsiders do come to them but they tend to be very local to the show fields or family members who have left the area. They feature events such as stock judging, handicraft and produce tent, duck and horse racing, pet shows etc. The bar is often a horse box.

It struck me that they also had a much more fragile feel. The shows are only just recovering from the foot and mouth outbreak in 2001. Foot and mouth is an ever-present danger, and with proposed changes in EU membership and farm subsidies, I felt we should be doing what we could to record a way of celebrating that might change substantially or even be lost. Recording both projects would also involve doing oral histories and collecting historic documents and photographs where possible.

There will also be film and written records for people to look at in the museum. Our geographic footprint will be improved as more visitors are able to access aspects of these events they may not have before. The project will allow people who would not normally be inclined to go into a museum to do so, or to access our work in different ways. Overall, the project will reflect back the community to itself and allow it to value how unique it is.

AIM: What was the AIM Hallmarks Awards application process like for you?

CA: My colleague, Krysia Bass, and myself both found the process of applying for a grant was much more straight forward than many. I am not a trained fundraiser and found it quite manageable.

AIM: That’s good to hear Catherine – so what advice or tips would you give to other organisations applying for an AIM Hallmarks Award in Round 3?

CA: I would say that the most important thing is to find a project you feel passionate about. If you don’t really care…why should anyone else? The second thing is obvious – make sure that what you want to do fits with AIM’s criteria. And lastly, have all the fairly tedious but necessary information and statistics about your organisation to hand.

AIM: We are looking forward to seeing how this unique project develops Catherine – so what do you think the legacy of the AIM Hallmarks Award will be for the museum and your community?

CA: I would say that the main legacies for our community will be that participants will be positively affected by the process of recording the shows. People will be able to look at what we produce and remember their experiences. Their children will be able to look back in time and see and hear significant people in their locality.

I hope we will benefit from a raised profile and good will. We will also be able to capture a way of life for future generations to learn from and enjoy finding out about. As we are a largely volunteer run organisation. I anticipate that people will see the value in our work and come forward to help us in the way they did when we were set up as a community arts organisation and community museum.

AIM: Thanks for your time Catherine. Finally, what would you say to encourage other AIM members to apply for an AIM Hallmarks Award?

CA: I would encourage people to go for the award. You will find the process easier than most. It will help you realise a project you feel passionate about or will help you to develop one. That in turn will allow you to revisit and re-evaluate who you are and what you do.

Application information for the AIM Hallmarks Awards

Offering grants of between £5,000 and £15,000, the AIM Hallmarks Awards help AIM member museums and heritage sites to begin to use the principles in the AIM Hallmarks to improve the way they work.

The third round of the AIM Hallmarks Awards is now open for AIM members in England and Wales with applications closing on 15 May 2017 – but how could you use an award in your museum?

The AIM Hallmarks Awards can be used by successful applicants in two distinct ways:

*To fund an organisational review: This can involve either review and planning, or taking forward new ways of working. Some museums might want to use the AIM Hallmarks as a framework to review their organisational health and can apply for this funding for support in planning future development

*To contribute to a project that supports applicant organisations to behave or develop differently: Museums which have already identified development needs reflecting the principles of the AIM Hallmarks, can apply for funding to put their ideas into practice and progress programmes of work which will enable them to become more resilient and to prosper in the future. Projects can be linked to any of the Hallmarks but must seek to support change at a strategic level and/or to have an impact on organisational culture and behaviour.

The AIM Hallmarks Awards have already helped AIM members in England and Wales to review their organisational health or to develop new ways of working and we strongly encourage potential applicants to discuss their ideas with AIM’s Assistant Director, Helen Wilkinson, before applying.

You can contact Helen by email: helenw@aim-museums.co.uk or by phone on: 0771 966 7102

All information about the AIM Hallmarks Awards including guidance notes and application form can be found on the AIM Hallmarks Awards page.

ACE and WG Logo

Advertisements

Consultants Appointed for Diversifying Museum Visitors Project

Julie Aldridge Associates with Mel Larsen and Pam Jarvis have been appointed to undertake a ground breaking project that will help museums to increase the diversity of their visitors.

The key focus of the project will be on providing tools and guidance to help museums make long-term change in their organisations to achieve this. It will focus on how to attract more people to a museum’s core offer, rather than engaging with them through special projects, which are increasingly challenging to sustain in the current financial climate. The consultants will be working directly with museums, using co-production techniques, to investigate the challenges and develop ways of helping museums make the progress they want to in this area.

The project is being led by the Association of Independent Museums (AIM). The project steering group includes AIM and four other organisations who are funding the project – Arts Council England, the Museums Archives and Libraries Division of the Welsh Government, Museums Galleries Scotland and National Museums Northern Ireland – as well as the Museums Association and people working in museums that have specialised in this area. The project will cover museums of all types, across the whole UK.

Black Country Living Museum

Image: Courtesy of Black Country Living Museum, Dudley

Tamalie Newbery, Executive Director of AIM, said “There has been a huge amount of interest in this project already. By attracting new audiences, museums better fulfil their missions and increase their sustainability, so it is an extremely important area on which to focus. AIM’s 2016 research into the impact of admission charges, ‘Taking Charge’, showed that free admission is not enough to attract more diverse visitors by itself. We know that lots of museums, whether free-entry or charging for admission, are very committed to diversifying their visitors, but it often seems hard to achieve. This project will look at why that is and how some museums have overcome those challenges.”

Julie Aldridge Associates with Mel Larsen and Pam Jarvis were appointed from a very strong field, after an open call for proposals. Julie Aldridge commented, “We’re delighted to be appointed to work on this significant and timely programme.  We’ve come together as a trio of consultants to combine experience – across visitor development, diversity and inclusion, research, and producing resources and development programmes – to support and enable museums to achieve their ambitions.”

“We were particularly interested in taking part due to the co-creation emphasis that the steering group suggested for this work.  We believe this approach is vital to creating something that works well for a broad mix of museums and helps overcome both internal and external barriers.  We will shortly be announcing opportunities to get involved in the project and will be looking for people interested in exploring it with us, to share knowledge, inspire ideas, and to try out, test, and help shape the development of a practical toolkit designed to support people to make a significant impact in diversifying museum visitors.”

The results of the research are expected to be launched in the Autumn.

 

Project logos

Participants In Round 2 Of The AIM Leaders And Enablers Programme Announced

We are delighted to announce the participants in Round 2 of the AIM Hallmarks Leaders and Enablers Programme. Both programmes aim to equip participants to help museums prosper using the AIM Hallmarks and the programmes combine insight from museum practitioners with new perspectives from the broader charities sector. This combination offers fresh ways to think about the challenges museums face. Participants on the Leaders programme are either museum directors or senior managers, while the Enablers are museum development staff and consultants.

Both groups will take part in a series of Residential learning events over the coming months, with the opportunity to support each other through Action Learning sets. Hilary Barnard and Ruth Lesirge, our programme facilitators, both bring a wealth of senior management and governance experience and are constantly on the lookout for interesting examples and case studies which will get debate and discussion flowing.

The programmes have been supported by Arts Council England with additional funding support from the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation and AIM. AIM would like to congratulate all successful candidates taking part in both programmes.

Beamish Museum 1900s Town

Participants from across the UK are taking part in the 2017 AIM Leaders and Enablers Programme (Photo credit: Beamish Museum)

The participants are:

AIM LEADERS

Anthony Hayes – Volunteer and Operations Manager, the Pen Museum

Chris Price – General Manager and Director, North York Moors Railway

Celyn Gurden-Williams – Head of People Development, Beamish Living Museum of the North

Ernestos Karydis – Manager, Arundel Museum

Margaret Harrison – Collections Manager, Canal and River Trust

Miranda Rowlands – Shared Enterprise Project Officer, Norfolk Museums Service

Rebecca Nash – Director, Royal Engineers Museum, Library and Archive

Sarah Bardwell – General Director, Britten-Pears Foundation

Tonia Collett – Museum Manager, the Tudor House Museum

Vicky Hope-Walker – Project Manager, National Paralympic Heritage Trust

Victoria Rogers – Museum Manager, Cardiff Story Museum

Wesley Salton – Head of Development, London Transport Museum

AIM ENABLERS

 Working in Museum Development:

 Bryony Robbins – Museum Development Officer, Cornwall Museums Partnership

Claire Walsh – Hertfordshire Museum Development Officer

Liz Denton – Museum Development Yorkshire

Lynn Podmore – Museum Development, Conwy

Lynsey Jones – Museum Development North West

Rachel Bellamy – Community Heritage and Museums Development Officer for Somerset

 And working independently:

 Claire Turner – independent consultant

Dana Andrew – independent consultant

Fiona Marshall – independent consultant

Jenny Williams – from Take the Space creative agency

Mairead O’Rourke – independent consultant

Kate Elliott – DBA consulting

Rachel Souhami – independent consultant

 

ACE AIM EF Logos for HM LE

Opportunity to take part on AIM Leaders

Unfortunately, one of our participants on the Leaders programme has had to withdraw because of unforeseen personal circumstances, so we have the possibility of a last-minute place for a leader from an Accredited museum, in either England, Scotland or Wales. If you are interested, please contact Helen Wilkinson, helenw@aim-museums.co.uk as soon as possible for further information.

 

AIM Hallmarks Awards: Final Round Now Open For Applications

The third and final round of the AIM Hallmarks Awards is now open for AIM members in England and Wales with applications closing on 15 May 2017. Offering grants of between £5,000 and £15,000, the AIM Hallmarks Awards help AIM member museums and heritage sites to begin to use the principles in the AIM Hallmarks to improve the way they work.

This can involve either review and planning, or taking forward new ways of working. For example, in Round 1 of the AIM Hallmarks Awards, The Lightbox Museum and Art Gallery in Woking used their grant to work more effectively with millennials, which you can read about HERE. Organisational review projects funded include one for Amgeudffa Pontypool Museum.

LB large

The Lightbox Museum and Art Gallery in Woking used their grant to work more effectively with millennials (Photo credit: The Lightbox)

Work funded by an AIM Hallmarks Award must be demonstrably central to an applicant museum’s organisational development and closely linked to the museum’s strategic plan. Where possible, we are keen for projects to innovate, trialling approaches or ways of working which are either wholly new to the museum sector, or new to museums of a particular kind or size. In Round 2, for example, the Royal West of England Academy received funding to trial offering executive training away days to corporate clients as a means of income generation.

Helen Wilkinson, AIM Assistant Director, said: “We’re really open to a wide range of proposals – either for doing some serious thinking about the future of your museum, or testing out an idea you already have. We’re looking for fresh thinking and energy above all else – could you use a Hallmark Award to lay the foundations for a new way of working?”

Who Has Already Benefitted From An AIM Hallmarks Award?

In the second round of awards, five were made to museums and heritage sites in England, and three to museums in Wales.

Successful applicants in England were:

Radstock Museum in Somerset, awarded £12,000 for a project to remodel the main permanent displays in the gallery to reflect its name change to Somerset Coalfield Life at Radstock Museum. In doing so, the museum hopes to attract a wider and more diverse audience and enhance their learning offer to engage schools.

Seven Stories and the Mary Rose Trust both awarded funding for in house programmes of leadership development for staff (£8720 for Mary Rose Trust and £11,660 for Seven Stories).

Priest’s House Museum, Dorset, awarded £10,000 for an organisational review.

Brantwood Trust, awarded £7,842.00 for a project to share Ruskin’s ideas with a wider audience through collections digitisation and videos for its website.

Royal West of England Academy, awarded £9,060.00 for a project to develop packages of executive development training, using the museum’s collections, as a means of income generation.

c41[8665]

Priest’s House Museum, Dorset, awarded £10,000 for an organisational review

And in Wales:

Cardiff Story Museum awarded £8000 for a marketing review, to enable it to improve its financial resilience.

Rhayader Museum and Gallery, awarded £10,590 for a project to document local town and country shows, using volunteers in innovative ways.

Pontypool Museum, awarded £5000 towards the costs of an organisational review.

How To Apply

AIM Hallmarks Awards in England

AIM Hallmarks Awards in Wales

The third round of the AIM Hallmarks Awards is now open for AIM members in England and Wales with applications closing on 15 May 2017.

If you are considering making an application to the final round of the Hallmarks Awards, guidance notes to support your application are available here AIM Hallmarks Awards

Or you can email Helen Wilkinson on helenw@aim-museums.co.uk.

wg-ace-combo

 

 

 

 

Consultant/s Sought For Groundbreaking Diversifying Museum Visitors Project

Increasing the diversity of their visitors is one of the aims of many museums. It directly relates to the core purpose of museums, as well as offering the opportunity to support museums’ sustainability. Whilst there have been previous studies in the museum and related sectors, progress towards this goal has been limited for the majority of museums.

We are seeking a consultant or consultants to undertake a UK-wide project, the purpose of which is to help museums to increase the diversity of their core visitors. The key focus of the project is on providing tools and guidance to help museums make long-term change in their organisations to achieve this.

stocksnap_lb29oti3nz

We expect the project to include a review of existing literature, examination of case studies and production of guidance, toolkits, frameworks or other types of support, which should be co-produced with a range of different types of museums. Consultants are also asked to make recommendations about actions that sector support organisations should take and about rolling out the outcomes of this project, as well as long-term evaluation.

The project is led by the Association of Independent Museums, in partnership with Arts Council England, Museums Association, Museums Galleries Scotland, National Museums Northern Ireland and Welsh Government. There is a budget of up to £25,000. The work is to be completed by Autumn 2017.

Consultants or consortia interested in applying should download the Invitation to Tender below:

Invitation to Tender Diversifying Museum Visitors

Proposals should be submitted to tamalie@aim-museums.co.uk by 5pm on 16 Feb 2017

diversifying-museum-visitors-project-combined-logos

Helping To Shape Museums Now And In The Future: The AIM Hallmarks Leaders And Enablers Programme

The AIM Hallmarks Leaders and Enablers Programmes – now recruiting to their second round – aim to combine insight from museum practitioners with new perspectives from the broader charities sector. This combination offers fresh ways to think about the challenges museums face, and applications are welcome from those that lead or support museums until Monday 16 January at 9am

Programme speakers include Sarah O’Grady, who helped participants in Round 1 of the Leaders programme think through some of the challenges of organisational change, and she will be working again with participants in Round 2. Sarah brings experience of dealing with a very challenging, politically charged change process, having been chair of Amnesty UK during a difficult time for the organisation, taking over when the previous chair resigned suddenly in 2013. Round 1 participants appreciated her candour and willingness to share her experiences of what it feels like to guide an organisation through difficult change and we’re sure that our new programme participants will also enjoy the chance to talk to her about her experiences at Amnesty.

From the museum sector, Janet Barnes, former Chief Executive of York Museums Trust, shared insights from her time at York in Round 1 of the Programmes, reflecting honestly on things she wished she had done differently, as well as the work that gave her most satisfaction and the approaches that helped the organisation move forward and change. Janet has spent 37 years in the museums and galleries sector with experience in both the public and charity sectors successfully leading three organisations through major constitutional change. Governance, implementing cultural change within creative organisations and fundraising are areas of particular interest to Janet and she will be working again with participants on Round 2.

le-speakers-collage

The AIM Hallmarks Leaders and Enablers Programmes – now recruiting to their second round – aim to combine insight from museum practitioners with new perspectives from the broader charities sector

Hilary Barnard and Ruth Lesirge, our programme facilitators, both bring a wealth of senior management and governance experience, and are constantly on the lookout for interesting examples and case studies which will get debate and discussion flowing. Participants in Round 1 have looked in detail at the lessons that can be learnt from the experiences of organisations ranging from Kids’ Company to the Friends of Highgate Cemetery. A session on innovation used the experiences of the Team GB cycling team to explore the theory of marginal gains – small focused improvements which, cumulatively, produce the winning performance. The approach is inspired by Kaizen, the Japanese concept of small but continuous improvement which helped the country to rebuild its car industry after World War II, and it has lessons for museum leaders in how to improve without enforcing dramatic change.

“A lot of the voices around innovation are powerful advocates for radical innovation,” says Barnard, “and radical innovation, by which we understand something brand new or a new way of delivering something like services, has its place but in percentage terms the amount of innovation which will fall in that category is actually quite small. Kaizen is about taking small steps of improvement…the notion that you take a small step then breathe a huge sigh because you won’t now have to do anything for a long time is not what we are talking about with incremental. It is the ability to be continually moving things on.”

All this combines with the practical, hands-on current knowledge of many of AIM’s Council members, including our Chair Richard Evans, Director of Beamish Living Museum of the North, to offer a rich and challenging programme which will provide useful tools and fresh perspectives to help participants shape museums for years to come.

For more information on the Leaders and Enablers Programmes, see the AIM website: AIM Hallmarks Learning but hurry, the closing date is Monday 16 January 2017 at 9am.

Print

 

 

 

Arts Council England Welcomes Evidence Of Cultural Shift

Arts Council England today launched its diversity data report Equality, Diversity and the Creative Case 2015/16 at their Power Through Diversity event in Manchester. The Report shows that there are signs of a cultural shift emerging around workforce, with more black and minority representation, but that more progress was needed, particularly in the area of disabled representation.

For the first time the Arts Council has collected and published data on the socio-economic profile of audiences. The report shows that those most actively involved in arts and culture tend to be from the most privileged parts of society. This adds to previous research from DCMS’s Taking Part surveys which looked at the diversity of audiences and revealed that Black, minority ethnic, and disabled audiences continue to be underrepresented.

diversity-1

Speaking at the event, Arts Council England’s Chief Executive Darren Henley said, “Our challenge is to remain focused on that mission – to bring great art and culture to everyone.” Darren, who has authored two Government reports on the importance of cultural education, said: “From cultural education, through apprenticeships, training and skills, to higher education, to leadership opportunities. We need to see where the barriers and gaps are, and how we can overcome these. Any young person, whether disabled or not, black, Asian or working-class white, urban or rural, should feel that if they’ve got the talent and the commitment, we’re offering them a roadmap to success.”

It is also the first time the Arts Council has collected diversity data on leadership. The data reveals that women, and people who identified as Black, minority ethnic or disabled, are underrepresented in boards and senior roles in the arts and culture sector. Darren called for sustained investment in talent across the sector: “That means putting diverse talent at the centre of our work and at the top of our organisations.”

He also reiterated the Art Council’s commitment to capturing reliable data as this remains crucial to the sector’s case for public investment. He said, “We must be able to present an accurate picture of progress and of problems, and when we identify those problems, what we’re going to do about them.”

Arts-Council-England-Darren-Henley

Arts Council England’s Chief Executive Darren Henley said, “Our challenge is to remain focused on that mission – to bring great art and culture to everyone.”

Key report findings include:

Sector Workforce (pages 10-18 of the report):

From data submitted by National Portfolio Organisations we see that:

17 % of the workforce is Black and minority ethnic

4% of the workforce identifies as disabled

55% of the workforce are female

The most represented age group was aged between 20 and 34, which made up 29% of the workforce

From data submitted by Major Partner Museums we see that:

7% of the workforce is Black and minority ethnic

4% of the workforce identifies as disabled

62% of the workforce are female

The most represented age group was aged between 20 and 34, which made up 17% of the workforce

Leadership (page 18):

8% of chief executives, 10% of artistic directors, and 9% of chairs, are black and minority ethnic.

5% of the Chief Executives, Artistic Directors and Chairs have a disability.

And although well over half of the sector workforce is female, percentages are lower in the most senior positions: 43% of Chief Executives, 28% of Artistic Directors and 32% of Chairs are women

Arts Council England’s Workforce (p29):

11% of the workforce and 18% of directors are Black and minority ethnic

4% of the workforce identifies as disabled

65% workforce are female

Download a copy of the Arts Council’s report here:

Equality, Diversity and the Creative Case 2015/16

A full copy of Darren Henley’s speech is available from the Arts Council England press office. Please email: Alison.Millar@artscouncil.org.uk

 

 

 

 

 

Increase Your Knowledge And Skills In 2017 With AIM

If you are looking to increase your professional knowledge and skills to enable you and the museums that you lead or support to flourish in 2017, then make sure you apply for the AIM Hallmarks Leaders and Enablers Programme which is now open for applications.

You might be a Museum Director who wants to build a supportive network of peers facing similar challenges – or to share ideas – or perhaps you are a Museum Development Officer or Consultant looking to extend your range of tools to resolve dilemmas and address complex issues. Whatever your role, the range of practical tools, ongoing support and new networks will inspire you with new ideas and enhance your confidence.

The AIM Hallmarks Learning Programme has been developed to address the needs of those who lead or support museums and is delivered on behalf of AIM by Ruth Lesirge and Hilary Barnard: highly experienced consultants with a strong track record of supporting chief executives from across the voluntary sector.

e-bw-2

The learning programme is delivered over a series of short residentials to make it as easy as possible to fit in around work and personal commitments and participants in Round 1 commented that they appreciated the flexibility of the programme.

Each residential features expert guest speakers; usually one from the museum sector and one from the broader voluntary sector to offer a rich range of perspectives and we will be announcing our 2017 schedule of speakers very soon.

There are 12 places on each of the programmes for people working in or for museums in England, supported by Arts Council England. There are 2 places for museum leaders working in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland, supported by AIM. If you work in a museum development role in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland and are interested in the Enablers programme, please contact us to discuss the possibility of a self-funded place.

e-bw-1

Round 2 of the AIM Hallmarks Leaders and Enablers Programme is now open for applications with a closing date of 9 January 2016 and further information including the benefits of participating, scheduled dates for the residential and costs and eligibility are available to download below and from the AIM website:

Leaders – Programme Outline: Leaders – Programme Outline PDF

Enablers – Programme Outline: Enablers – Programme Outline PDF

Full information on the AIM website: AIM Hallmarks Leaders and Enablers Programme

Print

AIM Survey 2016: Please Tell Us What You Think

We are thinking about how AIM can better help heritage organisations prosper in the next few years and we’d really like to know what you think. We’ve put together a survey to help you share your views with us and we’d be grateful if you would take five or ten minutes to complete it.

You are welcome to complete the survey even if you are not an AIM member.

Survey link: AIM Membership Survey 2016

Last time we asked you to complete a survey like this (in 2014) we were thrilled at the response and it made a big difference to what we do. The results were used by AIM Council to help develop our planning for 2015-18 and helped us create the Hallmarks of Prospering Museums.

It also helped us to secure the £900,000 investment from Arts Council England and funds from the Welsh Government, which are being used now through our Hallmarks programmes of leadership development, grants and governance support. Most of all – it helps us understand your challenges and how we can do more to help you. 

membs-twitter-3

The survey is primarily designed for people working in or supporting heritage organisations, so some of the questions may not be relevant if you are a supplier or consultant member (and thank you again to those of our suppliers and consultants who completed our survey for you last year.)

Please consider sharing this link with colleagues in the museum and heritage sector.

Thank you in advance for taking the time to let us know what you think. We will share the results with you in the February Bulletin and on the AIM blog.

If you have thoughts that don’t fit in the survey, please email me as well at tamalie@aim-museums.co.uk 

Tamalie Newbery

Executive Director (AIM)

 

Round 2 Of The AIM Hallmarks Leaders and Enablers Programme Is Now Open

The second round of the AIM Hallmarks Leaders and Enablers Programme is now open for applications. AIM’s development programmes support people who work in or with museums, with the aim of helping heritage organisations prosper.

The AIM Hallmarks Museum Leaders Programme provides practical tools, useful insights and a supportive peer network to equip museum directors to realise the full potential of their organisations.  Guest speakers from across the wider third sector will enable you to learn from successful charities, particularly focusing on organisational resilience and leadership. The programme will give you:

*Increased confidence, knowledge and skills

*The tools to increase the resilience and long term prosperity of your museum, strengthening its organisational culture and embedding the AIM Hallmarks

*A mutually supportive peer network

*A positive approach to problem solving

*Opportunities for reflection and review

“The AIM Museum Leaders course provides an invaluable opportunity to better understand and develop your own leadership skills, and offers a constructive and supportive environment to constructively review your Museum and gain new insight into how to implement change,” said Eleanor Pulfer-Sharma, Director, Bentley Priory Museum and a participant in Leaders Round 1.

“The programme is a worthwhile investment of your time and energy, to promote your development as a leader in the museum sector and to equip you and your organisation to be resilient in the face of the many challenges that lie ahead, particularly given the political and financial uncertainty of the next few years,” said Jason Semmens, Director, Army Medical Services Museum and a participant in Leaders Round 1.

There are 12 places for museum leaders in England, and 2 places for museum leaders from Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland.

Visit the AIM website for application information: The AIM Hallmarks Museum Leaders Programme

Applications close: 5pm on Monday 9 January 2017

Download: aim-hallmarks-leaders-enablers-programme-brochure-2017

Startup Stock Photos

The AIM Hallmarks Enablers Programme is for people who support museums through their work, for example through Museum Development or as independent consultants. It aims to equip participants to support organisations more effectively. Participants will become part of a skilled group of enablers who can support museums to use the AIM Hallmarks, helping them prosper.

The programme gives you the chance to develop consultancy and coaching techniques and use them effectively to help organisations change. It will develop your understanding of how organisations work and of the challenges of leadership, with insight from senior managers and trustees.

Through the programme, you will have chance to build a dynamic portfolio of tools to use in your work with museums and become part of a peer network and share ideas and insights.

The programme will give you:

*High quality facilitation techniques to use with museums

*The opportunity to develop independent thinking and new approaches to complex issues

*A mutually supportive peer network

*A positive approach to problem solving

*Opportunities for reflection and review

“Engaging with the Enablers programme has allowed me to evaluate and strengthen my relationships with museums. It is helping me to develop more effective mentoring, advocacy and facilitation skills which are transferable across all areas of Museum Development delivery,” said Sarah Spurrier, Museum Development East Midlands and an Enablers Participant in Round 1.

“Taking part in the Enablers programme has helped me develop my skillset and learn from and share ideas with the excellent Hilary and Ruth as well as an inspirational group of consultants and Museum Development Officers. Knowledge I have developed on the programme has enabled me to better support museum staff and trustees to embed change at their organisations and make their organisations more resilient,” said Laura Crossley, independent consultant and an Enablers Participant in Round 1.

There are 12 supported places for people working in England. If you work in a museum development role in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland, please contact us to discuss the possibility of a self-funded place. Consultants and freelancers are encouraged to apply.

Visit the AIM website for application information: The AIM Hallmarks Enablers Programme

Applications close: 5pm on Monday 9 January 2017

Download: aim-hallmarks-leaders-enablers-programme-brochure-2017

wg-ace-combo