Help run a charity but don’t think you’re a trustee? Read on…

This post has been created using content from an article that features in Issue 50 of Charity Commission News. AIM would like to thank the Charity Commission for allowing us to share this article on our blog.

Help run a charity but don’t think you’re a trustee? Read on….

Charity trustees are the people responsible for governing a charity and directing how it is managed and run. They may be called trustees, the board, the management committee, governors, directors, or something else. No matter what term the charity’s governing document uses, you are legally a trustee if you are part of the group of people with overall responsibility for overseeing and leading the charity and directing how it is run.

We are concerned that too many people serving on trustee bodies don’t realise they are trustees. As such, they don’t realise they must comply with charity law or that our guidance applies to them.

Check what your governing document says is the ultimate decision-making body in your charity. All properly appointed members of that body are charity trustees in law. You can’t opt to have the power without the responsibility, so you can’t pick and choose who is a trustee. If you discover you are a trustee, take time to read some of our core guidance, and make sure you understand your role going forward.

Please visit the Charity Commission News website HERE to download the full PDF of Issue 50

Thanks to Sarah Hitchings (Press Officer – Charity Commission) and the Charity Commission Media team for their support.

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