CAF publish Why We Give report and paper about why US style giving won’t work in UK

Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) has published “Why We Give“, the findings of research into why people give to charity. The report covers major motivations for giving, how donors think about their giving, what could encourage more giving and how much of their wealth should the more affluent give away in their life times.

The average Briton gives away £10 a month to good causes. But many people give away far, far more than that. They might not be able to muster the millions that major philanthropists can devote to the causes we all care about, but they devote thousands of pounds a year to doing good. What marks these people out? What makes them special? To find out, we surveyed more than 700 of Britain’s most generous people – people who give thousands of pounds a year to good causes through the Charities Aid Foundation (CAF). We have spoken to many of them as well, asking what motivates them to give, and what they get in return.

The factors that it was thought would  encourage more giving were:

  • More hard evidence of the impact of charities work (81%)
  • Companies doing more to support charities (78%)
  • Donors understanding existing tax breaks better (77%)
  • More generous tax breaks for donors (76%)

Arts Professional points out that the publication of Why We Give “coincides with the release of a new a CAF discussion paper Give Me a Break: Why the UK should not aspire to a US-style culture of charitable giving, which concludes that many of the factors that contribute to the success of charitable giving programmes in the US aren’t replicable in the UK and that the ‘fertile space’ for philanthropically-funded activity is much more limited.” The paper notes that tax breaks for charitable giving in the USA are weighted towards the wealthy, whereas Gift Aid in the UK enables a much larger number of people to participate in tax-efficient giving.

Major donors call for more tax breaks for giving | News | ArtsProfessional.

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